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Short Course Schedule and Descriptions

Please note that there is no fee to register for these courses.
To register please contact the individuals listed below.


Sunday

9-12 (I) · Room: 304

Brooks Rand MERX Users Group

The Brooks Rand MERX User Group short course will focus on the application of cutting-edge analytical technologies for research related to mercury in the environment. We will provide overviews of the state of mercury research in Canada and the United States, presentations of advanced measurement techniques in use by researchers, and new methods and applications developed by Brooks Rand Labs. We will also include presentations on new products and products in development, instrument maintenance and best practices, and small-group discussion sessions for participants to interact with other MERX users and experts from Brooks Rand Labs. This course will be of interest to current MERX users interested in new methods and applications, as well as those who would like to simply learn more about its capabilities. The course will last for three hours, including a coffee break.

Contact:
Brooks Rand
Telephone:
206-632-6206
To register:
email Brooks Rand
Please note the following in the subject line: "Short Course Registration."

Sunday

9-12 (II) · Room: 305

Mercury inventory development using UNEP’s ‘Toolkit for identification and quantification of mercury releases’

Inventory information is important to inform the national policy-making towards the current global mercury negotiations, to identify priority mercury sources in countries and to provide a baseline for national mercury management.

UNEP's "Toolkit for identification and quantification of mercury releases" is a tool for governments to develop inventories of mercury releases as basis for policymaking. The current version provides an approach to develop an ‘entry-level’ assessment of mercury releases. UNEP has successfully tested its entry-level mercury toolkit in the Latin America and the Caribbean region, and offers this short-course to train interested individuals in the use of the "Toolkit for identification and quantification of mercury releases – Inventory Level 1" and develop, to the extent possible, first level inventories with participants. Participants will be led through the guideline and calculation tool for the Toolkit Level 1. To be able to initiate inventory work, information on mercury sources following the Toolkit Inventory Level 1 should be collected in advance and brought to the short course. This work will be initiated through correspondence with participants.

Using the Toolkit Level 1 should make it possible to develop initial inventories relatively quickly and as such support national governments in the global mercury negotiation process.

Contact:
Ms. Rebecca Fisher
Chemicals Branch, United Nations Environment Programme
Telephone:
+ 41 22 917 8867
To register:

Sunday

9-12 (III) · Room: 306

Chemical Diplomacy: Negotiating Intractable Issues in the Global Mercury Treaty Negotiations

The aim of this half-day training session will be to use techniques from the emerging field of environmental conflict resolution in concert with scientific expertise on this topic to develop a practical approach for treaty negotiations. The program will be begin with a short general presentation (45 minutes) of ways by which scientists have been involved in such negotiations in the past and cover some of the strategies for conflict resolution from the literature. Participants will be provided some reading materials on this topic, gratis, as part of the session for further study. The second part of the program (2 hours) will focus on an analysis of specific areas of debate within the Global Mercury Treaty negotiations and how some of the strategies from conflict resolution can be applied in this context.We will specially try to address the issue of air emissions in this regard. Our goal at the end of the training session will be to have a tangible set of recommendations for negotiators in approaching these issues. IEDS is also available to provide follow-up mediation services pro bono to the negotiation process if needed. All interested parties, regardless of scientific background are invited to attend. Participants in this course might also be interested in the afternoon short course: "The Mercury Simulation: A negotiation simulation and training session about scientists’ roles in international negotiations.

Contact:
Saleem H. Ali
Director, Institute for Environmental Diplomacy and Security (IEDS)
University of Vermont
To register:

Sunday

1-4 (I) · Room: 2nd Floor Boardroom

The Mercury Simulation: A negotiation simulation and training session about scientists’ roles in international negotiations

For scientists working on mercury, the ongoing negotiations of a global mercury treaty have highlighted the importance of scientific input into global policy making. This short course will use a short role-play simulation on mercury to help scientists better understand their potential roles in international politics, exploring the consequences of representing scientific uncertainty in various ways. The short course will run for 3 hours, with 2 hours being a simulation and an hour of debriefing afterwards. Each participant will be assigned a role and receive a short briefing booklet. Players, who will represent countries, non-governmental interests, international scientific organizations, and business groups, will attempt to reach an agreement on the overall shape of a hypothetical treaty aimed at controlling mercury risks as the global scale. The game will also require the players to grapple with the likely impacts of technical judgments on political actors in the global “North” (the developed world) and the global “South” (the developing world).

Ultimately, the “results” of the role play should help to make clear how scientific information can be favorably employed in an environmental treaty making process and the positions held in the current negotiations. Through the well-documented dynamics of “experiential learning,” the simulation experience will help scientists understand how representations of risk and uncertainty are likely to affect treaty negotiation outcomes. The role play simulation will conclude with a one hour debriefing, allowing participants to reflect on their experiences comparing them with recent research findings about international treaty negotiations. All participants will receive a notebook with short articles on risk communication in international decision-making contexts. The results of the game will be used in a doctoral research project on the relationship between science and policy in international environmental negotiations.

Contact:
Leah Stokes, Noelle Selin
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
To register:

Sunday

1-4 (II) · Room: 202

Advanced Atmospheric Mercury Speciation: Standard Operating Procedures and Data Quality Assurance

This short course is focused on the Tekran Atmospheric Mercury Speciation System. The course is designed for current system operators that are part of monitoring networks or research projects. However those expecting to develop atmospheric mercury speciation measurement sites are also welcome. The course will be organized into three areas of focus. First, the course will cover basic operations and maintenance of the Tekran 2537-1130-1135 system with hands-on demonstrations. Second, we will look at methods used for quality assurance in the field and data quality criteria for data and system management. Third, will be a moderated open discussion to exchange knowledge and experiences. The course will be designed around Tekran knowledge and atmospheric network program knowledge in Canada (CAPMoN), USA (AMNET) and EU/Global (GMOS). A detailed syllabus will be developed and provided to participants prior to the conference .

Contact:
Dr. Eric Prestbo
Tekran Inc.
To register:
email Tekran Short Course Participation
The subject line should be "short course". Please provide detailed information about yourself and your atmospheric mercury speciation program or interest.